Miniature Bearing Temperature Sensors

Miniature bearing temperature sensors are specifically designed to provide accurate readings in areas where space is limited. They are made smaller to fit into these spaces without compromising durability or reliability.

Rotational systems rely on bearings to move smoothly and efficiently. Because of that, it’s important to monitor the bearings and ensure that they are in good condition. For that, you need sensors that can fit in tight spaces and record data accurately. Bearing RTDs are ideal.

What are miniature bearing temperature sensors?

To put it in simple terms, these are sensors that measure the temperatures of bearings. They are commonly used with large rotating plants — systems used in power generation, chemical processing, and manufacturing.

Miniature bearing temperature sensors are specifically designed to provide accurate readings in areas where space is limited. They are made smaller to fit into these spaces without compromising durability or reliability. That makes them ideal in a large number of systems that need bearing temperature monitoring.

How are they different from other sensors?

Bearing RTD installation is ideal in some cases specifically because of the dimensions of the devices. They can be made considerably smaller than traditional bearing sensors, making them perfect for extremely precise mechanical systems.

This is common in electricity generation where optimization is essential. Smaller bearing temperature sensors are necessary to fit into such tight-fitting areas.

Another important distinction with these types of sensors is the temperature range. Typically, they are rated for measurements between -40 and 250℃. Devices can be made for different operating temperature ranges, but this is the most prevalent range where miniature sensors are used.

What are their common applications?

The primary application is in the name. These are sensors that measure temperatures inside of bearings. That means they are essential for temperature readings in rotational mechanical systems.

When it comes to high-temperature rotational systems, you will most likely be seeing steam and gas turbines. These are used in a lot of different industries, but more than anything else, they are essential to power generation.

Whether generating electrical or mechanical power, these turbines need precise temperature measurement devices, which is where you will find miniature bearing temperature sensors.

 Which industries use these sensors?

 As mentioned above, energy generation is the primary industry. Alongside that, you might also find miniature bearing temperature sensors in applications related to oil, gas, chemical, and petrochemical industries.

Many of these processing plants use steam turbines to power the facility or manage high compression devices. In all of those applications, bearing temperatures are important.

 So, you will also find these sensors in manufacturing or refining facilities related to these industries.

What problems do they solve?

Specifically, a bearing thermocouple measures temperature. That might seem like a narrow span of application, but a temperature reading alone can provide valuable information in a few respects.

The temperature can be used to monitor for bearing wear. As a lot of wear is related to thermal expansion, temperature readings can identify when bearings are undergoing the most stress.

Similarly, temperature readings can inform oil breakdown, so the bearing sensor can also predict oil viscosity and efficacy while the system is in use. Ultimately, these sensors are used to spot wear indicators and help with maintenance schedules. They are also used in iterative design processes to explore the operational limits and optimal conditions.

Rotational systems need bearing monitoring. When precision matters, a miniature bearing temperature sensor is the best option. Temp-Pro has great options for you, so contact us and see what is available.

 

 

Comments (1)

Can I get more information on the miniature bearing temperature sensors. Spec sheet, part numbers, etc.

Thank you,

Marv Fernstrum

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